Slip slidin’ away

Went out for what should have been a short trip. Came across a really long traffic queue that was crawling very very slowly. It was that slow pretty much the only movement was coming from cars turning around. Then we saw the flashing blues. Getting closer we could see the police directing the traffic down side streets which were small and very congested. As it happened we got to the front of the queue when we were told to stop by one of the police. Then another police car arrived, then another, then more traffic being directed past us – so without needing to rubberneck we got a good look at the scene. It was a motorbike rider. Now on stretcher of sorts, surrounded – and I do mean surrounded, there were at least 6 – paramedics and ambulance staff, loads of police, at least 1 damaged car and a lot of spectators. His motorbike was shattered. I don’t mean scratched, I don’t mean the fairing was cracked, I don’t mean it had slid a bit. I do mean that there was barely anything left to identify it as a bike. I’ve seen a few broken things but never so much destruction in such a small place. And he was alive. Damaged hugely no doubt, but he was alive. And all this happened on a regular road with a 40 speed limit. Amazing.

My Dad always said I could not have a motorbike. He said that people died on motorbikes. I always corrected him on that point – they died not on the bike, but when they hit the ground at huge speeds. And strangely enough that’s just how I nearly died in 1990 …..

5 thoughts on “Slip slidin’ away

  1. “Bag of organs on wheels, ready for transplant” is how I’ve heard a couple of Doctors describe motorbikers. Didn’t come quite true for a distant relation who’s now living out his days in frustration after suffering severe brain damage.

    Let’s hope the fella was hugely lucky in some way.

  2. Does this suggest that bikes are dangerous, or that getting licences for half a ton plus of metal with the ability to hurt people so so badly is just too easy?

    Accidents are hardly ever referred to as such these days, more often as incidents, reflecting the fact that it’s not an accident, it’s something stupid that’s been executed.

    Motorbikes are amazing in so many ways as a form of personal conveyance, it’s the big hard stuff that people keep driving in front of them that seem to be more of an issue.

    I do hope the rider gets out ok.

  3. “His motorbike was shattered…I do mean that there was barely anything left to identify it as a bike. I’ve seen a few broken things but never so much destruction in such a small place. And he was alive.”

    That may have been what saved his life; much like the ‘crumple zone’ on a car which is expressedly designed to take away some of the momentum in a collision, the fact that the bike ‘shattered’ will have reduced enough of the force of the impact.

    “…they died not on the bike, but when they hit the ground at huge speeds”

    I agree. Sadly, not a lot you can do to mitigate that beyond padding and helmetting.

    And strangely enough that’s just how I nearly died in 1990

    A story for another day?

  4. I lost my elder brother to such an incident a couple of years ago.Because I am estranged from that side of the family no one told me what happened or the fact bro had died. So there I am, sat watching one of the south Yorkshire police traffic programs when guess who was the victim. Yep my brother. The program spared nor pulled any punches. Gave video footage of the scene. Showed the imprint of where my bro had his arm in front of his head in the bonnet of the van. Shocked, you bet.
    Bro was taken out by white van man, no licence, insurance etc, Just pulled out of junction to the wrong side of the road, resulting in head on collision and death. Oh the spineless van driver did a runner and left brother to die. He was finally caught and given 3 years!!!!!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *